Blade Runner
1982
In the smog-choked dystopian Los Angeles of 2019, blade runner Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) is called out of retirement to snuff a quartet of "replicants" -- androids consigned to slave labor on remote planets. They've escaped to Earth seeking their creator and a way to extend their short life spans. Director Ridley Scott's reedited version comes with a different ending and the omission of Ford's narration, giving the film a different tone.

Scott Hardie: “It ruled.”

A quarter-century after its initial failure at the box office, Blade Runner has joined a pantheon of widely-respected but dramatically ice-cold sci-fi classics like Metropolis and 2001: A Space Odyssey. There's so little warmth here, and not just in the refrigerated laboratory scene. Now appreciated as a cerebral cult classic, with the help of a much-improved director's cut, it plays best if you ponder its comments about the wastefulness of human invention and our self-perception as the gods of our world; less so if you're looking for a simple, fun action-adventure. A landmark of cyberpunk fiction, it introduced themes that other filmmakers still haven't resolved all these years later, even if they have found ways to make them more entertaining.

− April 14, 2008 • more by Scottlog in or create an account to reply

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