Scott Hardie | April 22, 2018
When we were kids, all of the accomplished famous people were older than us; not necessarily child actors or child athletes, but authors and musicians and leaders and world-changers. What was the first time you noticed someone younger than you accomplishing something in the world, as a sign of getting older?

Samir Mehta | April 23, 2018
[hidden by author request]

Erik Bates | April 23, 2018
Zuckerberg.

I've always had an interest in computer programming, web development, etc., but have never pushed myself to really do something about it. Now that 33-year-old jackass is a billionaire because he made an online yearbook.

Matthew Preston | April 25, 2018
Very close in age: Emmanuel Macron, president of France.

Most younger, but a tad older than me: The prominent faces in the NFL. The media talks like Peyton Manning is this ancient creature, but he's only 42.

Erik Bates | April 25, 2018
Holy shit the president of France is 40.

What have I done with my life?

Scott Hardie | April 26, 2018
Funeratic has been around since before Facebook, MySpace, and Friendster. I certainly wish I had the foresight to turn it into what they did, before they did.

Apparently I had my growing-up moment much earlier. I had just gone away to college at 18 when Fiona Apple's "Sleep to Dream" came on MTV, and I liked it so much that I bought the whole album. It floored me that someone my own age (she's only a few months older than me) could write an entire album, let alone one with some pretty good songs. Granted, she'd had a tough childhood that forced her to grow up fast, but I still felt like I had not accomplished much more in my own 18 years than writing some lousy stories and beating some video games. I could no longer use my age as an excuse to myself for not accomplishing bigger things. I think about that feeling from time to time.

Steve West | April 26, 2018
Oddly enough, watching Doogie Howser, M.D..


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