Jackie Mason | April 6, 2004
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Scott Hardie | April 7, 2004
As a personal preference, I have a real dislike for those giant tattoos that women have been getting on the smalls of their backs lately. They just look to me like giant stains, birthmarks gone out of control. But I'm all about tattoos on arms and legs. There's a tattoo parlor about every three blocks here (alternating with the pawn shops and strip clubs) and I've been thinking about finally getting the tattoo I've wanted since high school.

Jackie Mason | April 7, 2004
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Lori Lancaster | April 7, 2004
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Scott Hardie | April 7, 2004
It's not a shot at you. I went looking for photographs of such tattoos to use as a visual example, and that was the first one I found, and it was too perfect not to use. :-)

Lori Lancaster | April 7, 2004
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Kris Weberg | April 7, 2004
I don't hate or love tattoos on other people, but I do wonder what many will think when their twentsomething choice is still adorning their fiftysomething body.

Erik Bates | April 7, 2004
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Melissa Erin | April 7, 2004
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Scott Hardie | April 7, 2004
That's what kept me from getting one for a long time. But I've wanted the same one for ten years now and the desire has not diminished, so at a certain point the question changes from "should I?" to "will I?"

I want a double-cross. I'll take a picture if I have it done.

John E Gunter | April 7, 2004
The gets better with age is not true with tattoos. I've seen more than my share of older people who have one and they really don't look so good any more. Plus, once you've got one, you are kind of stuck with it for the rest of your life.

Sure you can get it removed, but I have yet to find someone who had one removed that doesn't have some kind of blemish where the tattoo used to be.

I've considered getting one myself, but keep going back to the nasty look they develop as you age. So I have yet to get one and will probably never get one.

Anna Gregoline | April 7, 2004
I think everyone at some point considers a tattoo these days. I wanted a scorpion for a long time, but waited. I went so far as to decide where I wanted it (tiny one on my back hip), and design the tattoo myself. But I waited, and I'm glad I did. Tattoos to me became so plentiful that they became boring. And now that I'm with Jesse, who doesn't care for tattoos, I'm glad I am unadorned.

Jackie Mason | April 7, 2004
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Anna Gregoline | April 7, 2004
Also, what about those women who get them on their stomachs and then get pregnant! Distortion City.

Melissa Erin | April 7, 2004
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Anna Gregoline | April 7, 2004
I feel like the Church Lady after hearing about that bikini tattoo - "Well, isn't that *special*!"

John E Gunter | April 7, 2004
My father would have had a complete fit if I had gotten a tattoo. He reacted bad enough to my long hair, when I had my long hair. Course, he never saw the 2 earings I have in my left ear, so I don't know exactly how he would have reacted to that, other than knowing it would have been bad. :-)

Course, the two of us used to fight all the time, until I got married. After that, he and I got along much better. I think he was always worried I'd turn out to me a looser, but once I got married, I think he realized that I was mature.

I'm glad the two of us had stopped fighting and made up. Otherwise, I would have had lots of regrets when he passed.

Melissa Erin | April 7, 2004
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Scott Hardie | April 7, 2004
Just wait till you have kids and you don't raise them the way she raised you. She's gonna take that well.

Scott Hardie | April 7, 2004
Here's something you don't have to wait till old age to regret.

Jackie Mason | April 7, 2004
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Melissa Erin | April 7, 2004
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Lori Lancaster | April 8, 2004
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Anna Gregoline | April 8, 2004
The eye jewelry thing is amazing, first of all, that someone would think of it, second of all, that someone would try it. And that other people think this is swell and want it too. Blecch.

Seriously, what is next? I don't really understand body modification this severe.

John E Gunter | April 8, 2004
Actually, after wearing contacts for more than half my life, that isn't to bad. Course, I wouldn't want to get anything between that and my eye, that is if you could get something between the two.

I've had my lenses slip to the back of my eye and then fold itself up. That's always painful and hard to get out of your eye. I've also had dirt, hair, etc get between my lense and my eye.

Plus, I've torn a lense and not realized it. But even with all those things, I still haven't hurt myself to the point where I can't see anymore.

Anna Gregoline | April 8, 2004
I've had all that happen with lenses too. But this thing is physically implanted into your eye. A piece of metal! Totally gross.

John E Gunter | April 8, 2004
Well, when they give you cataract surgery, the put an artificial lenses into your eye that's plastic.

Plus, when they replace a joint, it's metal usually. I would just hope that they make the jewelry out of what they call surgical steel.

Anna Gregoline | April 8, 2004
I would think they'd have to, or it would be illegal, at least in the U.S. it would.

Joints are useful. Cataract surgery with plastic lenses fixes a problem. It's not implants of foreign bodies for aesthetic purposes.

You could argue that earrings are foreign too, but your earlobe is not a body function most people like to have.

John E Gunter | April 8, 2004
I'm not arguing the usefulness of it, because it doesn't repair/replace a damaged body part. I'm just saying that people put other none 'natural' items in their bodies already, so this isn't really all that different other than it's not repairing a broken part as it were.

Earrings are the same idea as eye jewelry, just not on quite so drastic a scale. Personally, since you have a chance of damaging your eye with the eye jewelry and it doesn't do anything to make your life better, I wouldn't do it.

Where as my contacts make my life better, sure, I still risk injuring my eye, but it's no where near as invasive a procedure as the eye jewelry. When you think about it, piercing your ears is invasive, but nowhere near as bad as the eye jewelry appears to be. Same as tattoos, they are an extreme invasive procedure, sure the needle never goes in very deep, but that's a whole lot of puncturing going on!

Anna Gregoline | April 8, 2004
You risk injuring your eye with contacts, but it IMPROVES YOUR VISION. Getting a metal stud in your eye doesn't do anything for you, and is only potentially damaging. You said that this is the only difference. Big difference to me. Huge.

Anna Gregoline | April 8, 2004
This stuff also reminds me of a story I saw recently about women actually undergoing foot surgery to remove parts of their toe bones - so they could wear pointy, very high-heeled shoes.

SICK!

Melissa Erin | April 8, 2004
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Erik Bates | April 9, 2004
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Lori Lancaster | April 9, 2004
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Dave Stoppenhagen | April 9, 2004
My wife does, without shoes her head is at chest level with me, when she puts some of her shoes on she is as tall as my shoulders or a little over.

She catches all sorts of crap from my brothers. So Lori don't think you are the only woman that has ever been teased by those 2.

Lori Lancaster | April 10, 2004
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