publication date: Sunday, October 26, 2008 (part of Round XXXVI)

category: Literature

clue: While working late upon a goo, I tried to write an eerie clue referring to a falling house, but then I heard a tiny mouse, or so I told my beating heart as not to have it break apart, afraid that just a little breath would bring upon a crimson death from that which tapped inside my room where I now feared a certain doom, so scary were those growing knocks I felt quite trapped inside a box beneath the earth outside my door, where I was sure forevermore my murder would remain unsolved, unless the open case revolved around a single stolen note I somehow found the time and wrote, to warn about the urgent noise that kept me from my website toys, but then I realized like a fool that what had made me lose my cool was just my fingers spelling out this clue to tell you all about a Boston poet, tried and true, whose tangled rhymes became a goo, and just in time to set the scene for scary goos this Halloween.

explanation: Poe wrote The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Masque of the Red Death, The Premature Burial, The Purloined Letter, and The Raven. more…

solved by: Russ Wilhelm, Steve West, LaVonne Lemler, Samir Mehta, Chris Lemler, Justin Woods, Matthew Preston, Richard Slominsky, Joanna Woods, Denise Sawicki, Mike Rothstein, Steve Dunn, Amy Austin, Mike Eberhart, Jerry Mathis, Tony Peters, Lori Lancaster, Sarah Kyle, Walter Chesser, Shawn Brandt, and Samuel Franklin

Chris Lemler's Halloween Week This goo was part of Chris Lemler's Halloween Week.



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