These goos are from the Literature category, people famous for their works of literature including novelists, poets, nonfiction writers, and critics. Browse another way.

A.A. Milne

Most of his animal characters were named like their species, but for some reason the bear was named after poo. Go »

Agatha Christie

Who gave this best-selling novelist her mysterious orientation? The butler did it! Go »

Alexandre Dumas

Disaster recovery means all for one (and one for all). Go »

Amanda Hocking

Writing vampire romance books for teens can make anyone successful, even without a publisher. Who's the king? Go »

Amy Bloom

Her writing career blossomed when she turned away from being a therapist full-time. Go »

Amy Tan

You'll need all the joy luck you can get to recognize this Californian author. Go »

Andrei Codrescu

the original Exquisite Corpse Go »

Andy Weir

He's already a best-seller with only one book (and hit movie adaptation) to his name, about a resident of our nearest planetary neighbor. Go »

Ann M. Martin

Her YA novels have long been loved by babies and those who sit them. Go »

Anna Quindlen

Besides making news every week, this novelist is a truly loud voice in liberal opinion. Go »

Anna Todd

She wrote after before she wrote before after she wrote. Go »

Anne Brontë

Unlike her sisters, she was uninterested in an air of anonymity and unobsessed with acrophobia. She focused on a widowed renter. Go »

Anne Frank

Frankly, I never thought a little girl's diary would provide such a glimpse of pure evil. Hide! Go »

Anne Rice

It only takes a minute to cook a vampire. Go »

Arthur C. Clarke

This scribe of Rama is a prolific author, but he'd have to write about 2,001 more books to catch up with Asimov. Go »

Arthur Conan Doyle

It doesn't take a master sleuth to deduce the importance of the Pendleton Act in fighting corruption. Go »

Arthur Conan Doyle

Holmes, Watson, Moriarty, Lestrade, Adler, Moran -- and even Mycroft -- will live on forever, thanks to the imagination of this British doctor. Go »

Audrey Niffenegger

When she started writing, if she could have seen how successful she would later become, she might have gone back and started earlier. Go »

Ayn Rand

Capitalism and individuality were the core values of this Russian-born author-philosopher. Go »

Barbara Kingsolver

You can take the girl out of Kentucky, but you can't take Kentucky out of the girl. Who's the king? Go »

Beatrix Potter

mischievous rabbit and merchandise racket Go »

Beverly Cleary

A dog named Ribsy, a mouse named Ralph, and a girl named Ramona are the legacy of this popular children's author. Go »

Bram Stoker

Long before Stephenie Meyer and Anne Rice, this novelist got fans stoked about original bloodsucking count. Go »

Bram Stoker

This Irish novelist and theater manager gave bloodthirsty readers one of the greatest undying villains in all of literature. Go »

Candace Bushnell

New York's sex appeal hasn't been the same since Go »

Carl Hiaasen

This Floridian author kicks ass and won't surrender, and doesn't give a hoot if you have a problem with that. Go »

Carl Sandburg

This poet grew up in the tall grass of downstate Illinois, but eventually settled in the city of big shoulders nearby. Go »

Charlaine Harris

This author proves that Louisiana is not where best-selling literature goes to die. Go »

Charles Dickens

The famous beginning of his book about two towns could be summarized as: Good Times Bad Times. Go »

Chris Van Allsburg

His books about dangerous board games and Arctic-bound trains have captivated children for decades. Go »

Clive Cussler

According to his lawsuit, the adapted screenplay for his new desert movie is the pitts. Go »

Cormac McCarthy

The new American west is no country for pretty horses, orchard keepers, or children of God. Go »

Dallas Clayton

Writing children's literature is good. Becoming a financial hit on your own after every publisher turned you down is awesome. Go »

Dan Brown

Is it a coincidence or a code that the ninth goo of the round wrote a book about the ninth goo of the game? Go »

Dan Brown

Go »

Danielle Steel

No living author has sold as many books as this stainless scribe. Go »

Dashiell Hammett

The master of hard-boiled detective fiction eventually grew as thin as the title of one of his most famous works. Go »

Dav Pilkey

He has written about stupid rabbits and dogs of varying sizes, but his biggest hit was about a superhero who forgot to wear a costume. Go »

David Baldacci

He had an absolutely powerful debut novel, but he's been stuck in a no-man's-land of diminished sales ever since. Go »

Dean Koontz

This intense thrillmaster is afraid of nothing, except the offspring of demons and Mary Shelley's monster. Go »

Dennis Lehane

Long before Shutter Island, this author explored a different geographical place in his novel about three childhood friends from Boston caught up in the same mystery as adults. Go »

Dick King-Smith

books for babes (who's the king?) Go »

Douglas Adams

This author of travel guides revealed the answer to his own goo... 42? Go »

Dr. Seuss

This author from Springfield, MA must have loved little kids, because he wrote the best children books in town like Green Eggs and Ham. Go »

Dr. Seuss

If the name of this goo is too hard to discern, then think back to the books that first taught you to learn. He was not a real doctor, but boy was he smart! He invented whole worlds with his words and his art. First a cat in a hat, then a Sam he called Am, then a Grinch just as green as the eggs and the ham. Even though he is gone, his old books still bring joys to a new generation of girls and young boys. Go »

Dracula

Today, this bloodthirsty killer is counted among Victorian literature's greatest villains. Go »

E.L. James

Her renamed Twilight fanfic has dominated the bestseller charts this year. Go »

Edgar Allan Poe

While working late upon a goo, I tried to write an eerie clue referring to a falling house, but then I heard a tiny mouse, or so I told my beating heart as not to have it break apart, afraid that just a little breath would bring upon a crimson death from that which tapped inside my room where I now feared a certain doom, so scary were those growing knocks I felt quite trapped inside a box beneath the earth outside my door, where I was sure forevermore my murder would remain unsolved, unless the open case revolved around a single stolen note I somehow found the time and wrote, to warn about the urgent noise that kept me from my website toys, but then I realized like a fool that what had made me lose my cool was just my fingers spelling out this clue to tell you all about a Boston poet, tried and true, whose tangled rhymes became a goo, and just in time to set the scene for scary goos this Halloween. Go »

Edgar Allan Poe

A raven, a cask of Amontillado, a black cat, a tale-telling heart, a purloined letter, and a fallen house of Usher are the legacy of this master of the macabre, whose obscurity is nevermore. Go »

Edgar Allan Poe

One can only imagine the tintinnabulation of the bells that announced his 1835 marriage to his 13-year-old cousin. Go »

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Tarzan of the jungle and John Carter of Mars are the most famous creations of this popular author of Chicago. Go »

Edgar Rice Burroughs

He went from the jungle to outer space. Go »

Edward Bulwer-Lytton

This English author's pen used to be mightier than the sword, but now his name is synonymous with bad fiction. Go »

Edward Stratemeyer

The Bobbsey twins and the taser have this man in common. Can you solve the mystery? Go »

Elizabeth Gilbert

You don't have to eat goos for breakfast, pray for your opponents to lose, and love the tournament rules in order to win. Go »

Elmore Leonard

Hollywood considers it a crime to leave any of his novels unfilmed Go »

Emily Dickinson

This Massachusetts goo—
Who Wrote — and Read—
A lot of Poetry—
From her Bedroom—
Needs — no Introduction— Go »

Emily Post

This Baltimore native taught generations of Americans how to behave. Go »

Ernest Cline

Hollywood is more than ready to adapt his popular novels about video games. Go »

Ernest Hemingway

I don't know about the sea, but for the old man, the sun also rises. Go »

Frank Herbert

This guy's books about spice, worms, and a lot of sand became the best-selling science fiction series ever. Go »

Fritz Leiber

This Chicagoan was so seminal to the sword-and-sorcery genre that he coined the phrase himself. Go »

Garrison Keillor

This writer and speaker is known for his chronicles of lakes, prairies, and Norwegian plainfolk. Go »

George Orwell

Big Brother found out that some days in Burma are more equal than others. Go »

George R.R. Martin

This fantasy author's relationship with HBO runs hot and cold. Go »

Gertrude Chandler Warner

If you saw this goo teaching, would she tell her children how she became a writer? Go »

Gertrude Stein

A goo is a goo is a goo is a goo. Go »

Gillian Flynn

Her novels about shadowy locations are hits, so she's not going away soon. Go »

Gollum

The words "my precious" had such a nice ring to them that he muttered them for 500 years. Go »

Greg Bear

His pen is the forge of God, his desk the anvil of stars, his heroine the queen of angels. Go »

Gregorio Fuentes

This Cuban became messianic long before he became titular. Go »

Guy Boothby

This Australian author invented a diabolical doctor villain (no relation to Tesla) and a long-lived magical mummy. Go »

Guy de Maupassant

French author known for his brevity, in language and in form Go »

Gwendolyn Brooks

She was no Annie Allen, but this shy Chicagoan became Illinois's poet laureate. Go »

H.D.

T.p.i.b.k.b.h.i. Go »

H.G. Wells

Survival will be hard if Martians attack, but according to this author, it won't be much easier 800,000 years in the future. Go »

H.G. Wells

This author, who wrote classic novels about time travel, genetic horrors, an invisible person, and alien attacks, created a deep well of science-fiction concepts to inspire later authors. Go »

H.P. Lovecraft

This New England author turned tentacled monsters, extra-dimensional invaders, and maddening nightmares into cultish popularity. Go »

H.P. Lovecraft

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn. Go »

Harper Lee

This author is known for an acrimony towards songbirds. Go »

Haruki Murakami

Nobody does a better job of depicting the Kafkaesque complication and soullessness of modern Japanese society. Go »

Hillary Jordan

This Dallas native confronts the muddy matter of skin color in her novels, quite literally in one sci-fi book. Go »

Hunter S. Thompson

This self-described gonzo journalist was a proponent of freak power. Go »

Hunter S. Thompson

Don't be afraid to hate this writer even if he does set Garry Trudeau on fire. Go »

Ian Fleming

While serving on Her Majesty's secret service, he found inspiration for his most famous character, a spy who faced off against Dr. No, the man with the golden gun, and Goldfinger. Go »

Isaac Asimov

drafted regulations for automatons in triplicate Go »

J.D. Salinger

Franny and Zooey will never be as famous as his most beloved protagonist, Holden Caulfield. Go »

J.K. Rowling

A boy wizard conjured up enough money for this Brit to become the world's first billionaire author. Go »

J.K. Rowling

It's a good thing this writer took up Pottery. ...Just Kidding. Go »

J.R.R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel's profound influence on his chosen genre is no fantasy. Go »

Jack Kerouac

On the road to writing his biggest success, this author generated a beat for us to read by. Go »

James Ellroy

He channeled his grief over his mother's murder into a novel about the Black Dahlia case, and went on to expose more of L.A.'s confidential secrets. Go »

James Frey

When he was caught lying to Oprah, his career was shattered into a million little pieces. Go »

James H. Billington

This historian and Russophile wants to give away his book collection online. Go »

James Joyce

Dublin's day-long describer Go »

James Patterson

You would need more than one Clue to solve a murder faster than this best-selling author of the Alex Cross and Women's Murder Club novels. Go »

Jane Austen

Be sensible here: You're only guessing at this goo, not marrying her. Go »

Janet Evanovich

This mystery novelist has a plum success in her thirteen (and counting) bestsellers about a bounty hunter. Go »

Janette Oke

Love solves a goo. Go »

Jim Butcher

His popular books are about a wizard and private eye in Chicago, not a city in Germany. Go »

Joan Didion

She has written about white and blue, Miami and Bethlehem, fictions and confessions, and prayer and magic. Go »

John Green

He leveraged his video-blogging with his sibling into a best-selling YA lit career. Blame it on the stars, I guess. Go »

John Green

Even far away from his brother, this YA fiction author never forgets to be awesome. Go »

John Grisham

He's written about lawyers both rogue and street, as well as firms, partners, associates, and clients in general. Go »

John Grisham

His books are really designed to get clients to wear pelican underwear. Go »

John Jakes

He took us on a journey through 120 years of family history, but not once was Krypton ever mentioned. Go »

John Kennedy Toole

You can avoid being a dunce by recognizing this New Orleans writer with the presidential name. Go »

John Steinbeck

Stories of the Dust Bowl won this author a Pulitzer and a Nobel prize. Go »

John Steinbeck

He wrote about angry grapes, rodents and humans, and Eden's neighbors. Go »

John Updike

Five books about a running Rabbit are the legacy of this Pulitzer-winning novelist. Go »

Joseph Conrad

If you go to Poland to see this short writer, you will be alone and your heart will be left out in the dark. Go »

Joyce Carol Oates

If she could enroll in her own classes at Princeton, would she go by Kelly Smith? Go »

Judy Blume

helping teenagers deal with sex since 1969 Go »

Jules Verne

This Frenchman's heroes made fantastical journeys to the Earth's center, many leagues beneath the sea, around Earth in less than three months, and from here to the Moon. Go »

Junot Díaz

It doesn't take a genius to know that Cambridge has produced some pretty good writers. Go »

Kambri Crews

When she wanted to move to New York and become a professional storyteller, her parents wouldn't hear of it. Go »

Keri Arthur

This author's main character is being pressured to find the keys to the portals of Hell to keep a dark thing from our world. Go »

Kevin Kwan

His novel about billionaires in his native Singapore have made him crazy rich. Go »

Khaled Hosseini

want help? go fly a kite Go »

Khaled Hosseini

This Afghan's career is hotter than 1000 suns. Go »

Kim Harrison

This author's primary character may not live long without her pixy and vampire back-up. Go »

Kurt Vonnegut

After all of the horrific visions he witnessed and wrote about, instead of a high-school reunion, he'd have time-traveled back to high-school to prevent it from happening. Go »

L. Frank Baum

Dorothy was disappointed by the "wizard" that she and the scarecrow, tin man, and lion had followed the Yellow Brick Road to meet, but frankly, the real man behind the curtain was this imaginative American icon. Go »

Larry McMurtry

His most famous works are about a lonely bird, some loving nicknames, and a mountain with a spinal injury. Go »

Laura Ingalls Wilder

Her celebrated book series about American history is the very opposite of the trend towards enormous McMansions in home ownership today. Go »

Lee Child

It's not a reach to imagine this thriller novelist pleased that his work comes between Raymond Chandler and Agatha Christie. Go »

Lewis Carroll

This English author remains beloved for his writings about a girl who drank a shrinking potion, a grinning and disappearing cat, an insane tea-drinking hatter, a decapitation-obsessed crimson queen, and a nonsensical dragon made of gibberish. Go »

Lois Lowry

Her books about a Holocaust survivor, an emotional rememberer, and a short teller of tall tales have made her a beloved children's author. Go »

Long John Silver

Ironically, this fictional pirate had as great an influence on pirate mythology as any real treasure-seeker. Go »

Louis L'Amour

This Western writer loved the Old West so much, he wrote more than a hundred novels about it. Go »

Madeleine L'Engle

How many Christian children's authors base their books on quantum physics? Go »

Maeve Binchy

Oprah's endorsements made this Dublin writer a bigger hit than James Joyce. Go »

Mario Puzo

This 'family' man had super bros. and III godfathers. Go »

Mark Twain

One of America's most celebrated authors and humorists wrote about a Connecticut Yankee using an eclipse to save his life in King Arthur's court. Go »

Martin Amis

Sdrawkcab seog emit fo worra eht fi tahw? Go »

Mary Boykin Chesnut

She didn't just keep a diary of her life. She kept one of the entire Confederacy. Go »

Mary Higgins Clark

This "queen," who began writing as a young child, endured 40 publisher rejections early in life. After writing classes, literary workshops, and experience as a radio scriptwriter, she realized her aspirations for success as a novelist later in life, with an estimated 116,000,000 bestseller copies sold worldwide. Go »

Mary Shelley

Daughter of philosophers, wife of a novelist, she had plenty of Promethean figures in her life before she created one of her own. Go »

Mary Shelley

who knew that Frankenstein was a symbol of maternal guilt? Go »

Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

The genetic bond between these writers has led to critics interpreting Frankenstein as a feminist text. Go »

Maya Angelou

My-a, what a lovely caged bird this angel makes. Go »

Michael Chabon

The amazing adventures of this wonder boy are no mystery of Pittsburgh. Go »

Michael Crichton

In the Congo, this guy has a Sphere-ical Timeline. Go »

Michael Cunningham

This man's writing is best enjoyed after work, for over 119 minutes at a time, especially if your house is apocalyptic. Go »

Michael Jackson

moonwalking pop stars aren't known for their books about beer and whiskey Go »

Michael Ondaatje

One must be patient to come through this English novelist's oeuvre. Go »

Michael Sims

did your original ancestors have innies or outies? Go »

Mitch Albom

Tuesdays with his dying professor taught him what people to expect in Heaven. Go »

Molly Peacock

private poet Go »

Naguib Mahfouz

This prolific Arab writer outlived religious uproar and assassination attempts, but he didn't outlive Bertrand Russell. Go »

Nathaniel Hawthorne

This early American master gave us Hester Prynne, Hepzibah Pyncheon, Dr. Heidegger, and Giacomo Rappaccini. Go »

Nathaniel Hawthorne

helped Salem confront its history Go »

Neal Stephenson

This cryptographer predicted a snowy crash for cyberculture. Go »

Neil Gaiman

This author's books about sleepy immortals and reflective masks may or may not be popular with gay men. Go »

Nicholas Sparks

Sparks fly whenever his lovers meet, in best-sellers like The Notebook, A Walk to Remember, and Message in a Bottle. Go »

Nick McDonell

Publishing a novel at age 17 is enough to earn praise even from Hunter S. Thompson. Go »

Nora Roberts

In death, this author of over 200 romance and sci-fi novels has been so prolific that competitors have claimed she robbed them of shelf space. Go »

O. Henry

In a shocking twist ending, this goo is both an American short-story author and a candy bar made of peanuts, caramel, fudge, and chocolate. Go »

Octavio Paz

inspired by Hawthorne, married by Garro, honored by Nobel Go »

Orson Scott Card

His gaming approach to military science fiction in the 1980s was nearly ended by his conservative views in 2013. Go »

Pat Conroy

dysfunctional families are the root of psychological trauma, especially involving basketballs in faces and tigers in cages Go »

Pat Mora

Poetry is more of a holy ritual than a form of writing for this sometime children's author. Go »

Patricia Highsmith

By the time she dreamed up con artist Tom Ripley, Alfred Hitchcock had already adapted her first novel into a film in 1951. Go »

Paula Hawkins

Come on, her young female fans will do the locomotion with her. Go »

Peter Reading

This Liverpudlian almost enjoys reading poetry more than writing it. Go »

Phil Whitaker

This British doctor had never been to India when he wrote his first novel about as astronomical event there. Go »

Philip K. Dick

Blade Runner, Total Recall, and Minority Report were all based on works by this dickish author. Go »

R.L. Stine

This author, best known for giving children goosebumps, is so successful it's scary. Go »

Ray Bradbury

Before writing about tattooed men and book-burning, this sci-fi writer chronicled life on Mars. Go »

Raymond Chandler

He started writing so late that it's strange to remember him for his extended farewell. Go »

Ridley Pearson

This theme park aficionado has made a killing on the bestseller lists. Go »

Rita Dove

Can you win a Pulitzer for those little messages written on the wrapper? Go »

Roald Dahl

He wrote about giant peaches and chocolate factories, but not about lentil stew. Go »

Robert A. Heinlein

there's no such thing as a free goo Go »

Robert Bly

iron man Go »

Robert Burns

This fiery Scottish poet gave us the words to the first song we sing every year. Go »

Robert Crais

Time’s up according to this INDIGO goo. Go »

Robert Frost

The most famous poem by this New England author would have been about defying his GPS navigation device if it had been written today. Go »

Robert Jordan

His epic series about a mythic wheel went on for a longer time than he did, but he was no stranger to posthumous publication, having continued stories about a famous barbarian by another writer with the same first name. Go »

Robinson Crusoe

normally the game doesn't allow fictional characters, but this wouldn't be the first mistake Scott has made Go »

Ross Macdonald

This Canadian author hit the bullseye with his novels about the seedy side of Santa Barbara. Go »

Rudolfo Anaya

This Albuquerque-based author has had a blessed career. Go »

Salman Rushdie

As fishy as it sounds, this Indian author was in such a hurry to get killed he wrote a novel declaring Muhammad a liar. Go »

Sandra Brown

This colorful Texan has written dozens of best-selling romances and thrillers since her writing career began in 1981. Go »

Sandra Cisneros

This poet and novelist's delicious works cover such tasty topics as caramel and mangoes. Go »

Sapphire

Her fiery debut set the publishing world ablaze. Go »

Sax Rohmer

This author roamed between genres like pastoral fantasy, Islamic terrorism, and mummy-based horror, but his most enduring creation was a racist caricature of a crime lord with distinctive facial hair. Go »

Seth Grahame-Smith

Hollywood's hottest new horror writer started his career modestly, by "improving" upon Jane Austen. Go »

Shelley Jackson

This writer Go »

Sherman Alexie

spell your guess in smoke Go »

Sidney Lanier

Tiger-lilies in Chattahoochee? He was just makin' it up. Go »

Spider Robinson

It's fitting that this Canadian writer earned the Robert A. Heinlein Award, since he's been a lifelong fan and even wrote a book based on Heinlein's idea. Go »

Stephen King

A shining example of a stand in misery. Who's the king? Go »

Stephenie Meyer

This author's novels about teenagers falling in love at twilight by an eclipsed moon have become huge hits. Go »

Steve Martini

This San Francisco novelist has wielded undue influence over the crime genre for years. Go »

Stieg Larsson

you don't have to hack my computer to solve this mystery Go »

Sun Tzu

This general found art in unusual subjects. Go »

Suzanne Collins

Even on Thanksgiving, young readers are famished for good adventure stories. Go »

Terry Pratchett

I hope he saves his world on disk before he forgets it. Go »

Thomas Harris

His novels, all of them adapted by Hollywood, are about a cannibal and serial killer named for an ancient general. Go »

Tom Clancy

This (red) October, the net (force) sum (of all fears) will be (rainbow) six. Go »

Tom Stoppard

This playwright has made Shakespearean supporting characters (and Shakespeare) die and fall in love. Go »

Toni Morrison

This beloved author wrote one hell of a jazz song of Solomon. Go »

Truddi Chase

You may want to chase down this bunny, but if you catch her, she will scream in one of multiple voices. Go »

Truman Capote

His books Breakfast at Tiffany's and In Cold Blood changed literature, but not as much as two nuclear bombs changed warfare. Go »

Truman Capote

This journalist and author was about as likeable as a cold breakfast. Go »

Uncle John

Here's a little-known factoid: Your mother's brother can't count to eight, even when he takes a long time in the bathroom. Go »

V.C. Andrews

Her stories about extra-close families took her to the top floor of publishing success. Go »

Veronica Roth

Is it hard to write a trilogy about a teen dystopia when you're a successful published author before you graduate college? Go »

Virgil

The Greeks had Homer, but the Romans had this author of the Aeneid and the Georgics. Go »

Virginia Woolf

She wrote classics like To the Lighthouse and Mrs. Dalloway in a room of her own. Go »

W. Bruce Cameron

He used to terrorize his teenage daughter's prospective boyfriends, but now a different member of the family has given his life (and writing career) new purpose. Go »

W. Somerset Maugham

This mostly gay would-be doctor wrote about human bondage, a razor's edge, and a magician not unlike Aleister Crowley. Go »

Wallace Stevens

Come Sunday Morning, you may be disillusioned to see the time has come for building Snow Men at 10 o'clock. Go »

Walt Whitman

His poetry about grass, lilacs, and calamus made him a major American wit of the 1800s. Go »

Walter Kirn

After early success writing about a teenager who sucks his thumb, the future of his writing career is no longer up in the air. Go »

Washington Irving

His characters Rip Van Winkle and the Headless Horseman made him the father of American folklore, if not the father of his country. Go »

William Carlos Williams

This Passaic pediatrician and PR-born painter was a popular poet. Go »

William Gibson

This neuromancer is not just a towering figure in cyberpunk and steampunk, but an accurate predictor of the Internet and our tech-driven culture. Go »

Winston Groom

Life is like a box of chocolates: You never know when a film studio is going to claim that their international smash hit actually lost money so that they don't have to pay you a contractually-mandated percentage of the profit. Go »

Zak Ebrahim

He's no stranger to being a son of a cut-throat group. Go »

Zelda Fitzgerald

Along with her husband, a fellow novelist, this flapper and feminist icon was among the historical figures portrayed in Midnight in Paris. Go »

Zora Neale Hurston

Dis Floridiuhn goo's uhn inspiration fo' Alice Walkuh and Toni Mo'son and othuhs uh th' sort. Go »

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i couldnt
bring myself
    to publish
                       todays
brandnewcelebritygoo
  without
          comings to grip
with some
          EErie
               punctuation Go »