publication date: Friday, March 5, 2004 (part of Round XXII)

category: Legends

clue: Hungary's bloodiest murderess met her match in David Dawson.

explanation: Bathory was notorious for having young women abducted, then bathing in their blood to restore her youth. Along with Vlad Tepes of Romania, she is credited for inspiring the vampire legend. David Dawson was a vampire-hunting player character in The Weekly Curiosity, an RPG run by Scott on the same site as the goo game; Dawson fought and defeated a fictional Bathory in that game. more…

solved by: Steve West, Matthew Preston, Denise Sawicki, Steve Dunn, Erik Bates, Mike Eberhart, Dave Mitzman, Megan Baxter, Lori Lancaster, Todd Brotsch, Christine Marie Doiron, Anna Gregoline, Nadine Russell, Anthony Lewis, Dave Stoppenhagen, D. R., Angela Lathem-Ballard, Dan Donovan, Scott Baumann, Elizabeth Chesher, Jason Charles Butterhoff, C. K., and Allan Russell

player landmarks: This was the last goo solved by Dan Donovan.

trivia: This goo came about when Scott searched for "the" historical portrait of Bathory, and learned that there were two. One went up on The Weekly Curiosity site, and the other became this goo. Scott had considered creating a David Dawson goo, since Dawson is a famous celebrity within the fictional world of The Weekly Curiosity, but he decided it was better that a goo make a reference to TWC instead of originating there completely.

the Goo World Tour This goo represented Hungary in the Goo World Tour.



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